What we’re about…

Welcome to the website for the Friends of Bolin Creek!

Bolin Creek provides a home for an amazing diversity of creatures, including the rare four toed salamander, both in its waters and in the riparian buffer surrounding it. This stream also feeds into Jordan Lake, which is a water supply for over half a million people! Unfortunately, this wonderful stream is classified as impaired, meaning that it does not pass the standards set by our state for drinkable, fishable waters. In this site, you can learn about how to join us and make a difference to the creek!

2016 priorities:

  • Friends of Bolin Creek is asking for your support to request that the Town clean up the coal ash dump buried underneath the police station.  Sign the Petition by clicking on the blue tab to the right. Read more about the dump here.
  • We favor healthy creeks, therefore we oppose a consultant’s recommendation to install a 10 ft wide road next to Bolin Creek between Homestead Road and Estes Drive. Paved surfaces on creek banks will harm water quality, cause erosion to creek banks, and severely damage Bolin Creek’s ecological special home for wildlife.  Less damaging routes to ensure connectivity are available.  See map.
  • Instructing homeowners about how to build a backyard rain garden remains an important cornerstone of our education efforts. Stay tuned for a Spring workshop.

For more information or questions about how to help, contact friendsofbolincreek@gmail.com

Thanks, Friends of Bolin Creek
Artist’s map by Geneva Green, Geneva’s website: Greenstone Quarterly

Posted in Bolin Creek Watershed, Friends of Bolin Creek Community Exchange, Friends of Bolin Creek mission, Friends of Bolin Creek: Can We Heal Our Local Waterways? | Tagged | 1 Comment

Call to Delay Construction of Multi-use Greenway

At the end of April, the coach of the awarding winning cross country team learned that Carrboro planned to start construction on May 16th for a multi use road that would cross the wooded cross country trail three times.  The team and coaches turned out at the Board of Aldermens’ meeting on May 3.  Attached the letter to the Board from Friends of Bolin Creek.

 


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May 3, 2016

Dear Mayor Lavelle and Carrboro Board members:

Friends of Bolin Creek has great concerns about the Town of Carrboro’s current engineering and construction plans for the paved bike path on a route radically different from the route approved by Ron Olsen, the former high school coach in 2010. Therefore, we respectfully request that the Town of Carrboro halt the construction timetable to address the concerns of important stakeholders in this process.

We also request that the Town’s preconstruction meeting, to be held on this Thursday, May 5, at 5:30 p.m., include the following stakeholders as leaders and participants so that the community can understand the issues currently under discussion. These stakeholders should include the Chapel Hill-Carrboro School System, the cross-country team and its coaches, and Friends of Bolin Creek.

Back in 2010, the above stakeholders agreed in planning and construction of 1B to avoid at all costs the cross-country team’s training trail except for one unavoidable crossing. Now Carrboro’s construction plans call for crossing this trail used for training by our award-winning cross-country team in three places and following their training trail for approximately a third of its length, thus clearly affecting the team’s training and most likely its performance and potential for winning, not to mention raising the risk for injury of team members.

What is most distressing about this process is the lack of transparency related to all stakeholders as these plans were drawn up. Significant changes from the original plan and agreement for 1B were put in place without any outreach to those who had agreed to the plan initially, or to any other citizens to our knowledge. Stakeholders affected but left uninformed include, as we understand it, the Chapel Hill-Carrboro School System, the cross-country high school team and its coaches, Friends of Bolin Creek, the Town of Carrboro’s Greenways Commission and its Transportation Advisory Board, along with citizens in general.

We call on you to address our concerns and halt the construction and planning activities until the town reaches an agreement with all of the above stakeholders.

Thank you!

Julie McClintock , President, Friends of Bolin Creek

Click here to download a print-friendly version of this letter.

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NC DEQ Solar Bee Analysis

Last week the North Carolina Division of Environmental Quality Report released a report on the efficiency of the solar bees in Jordan Lake.  Ir was removed from the state website shortly after it was posted.  What we learn is that here is no solution other than to reduce pollution at its source.   NC DEQ Report

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A Wildflower Walk with Surprises!

The blog post from Maria de Bruyn; Posted on April 4, 2016

owl-img_3036c2a9-maria-de-bruyn-resThis past Saturday morning, we awoke to water streaming from the heavens in quite a heavy downpour. A local conservation group, Friends of Bolin Creek, had scheduled a wildflower walk to see some of our ephemeral spring blooms but the wet conditions were not inviting. A decision to postpone the walk to early afternoon was taken – and the weather-people had gotten it right – the sun began shining at mid-day and the temperature rose, creating lovely conditions for a walk after all. A large owl (later revealed to be granddaughter Kate of the group’s president) greeted the small group of intrepid walkers and we set off to see what we could find.  Read more here.

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Clean Up the Coal Ash Dump


Chapel Hill Police station, 828 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Chapel Hill

In May 2014, the Town of Chapel Hill informed the public that a coal ash landfill was found to be located on the site of the Chapel Hill Police Building. For more than a decade in the 1960s and ’70s, this property was used as a burial pit for coal ash. The coal ash in this unlined landfill contains known hazardous substances, including heavy metals that have leached out into the environment and will continue to do so.

The discovery of the coal ash deposit was likely made during a 2013-14 review of town property launched by the staff when considering the sale of town assets. The presence of the coal ash waste undoubtedly complicates the decision to sell the property. Whatever the town decides to do about the location of a new police station, we would expect that our Town will clean up the site. Chapel Hill residents deserve no less.

In a May 2014 letter to Mayor Kleinschmidt, Friends of Bolin Creek urged the Town to clean up the large coal ash dump and not to allow the coal ash to remain in an unlined pit in the center of town. Here is topographical map showing the location of the coal deposit.

The Town hired a consultant Falcon Engineering to make tests and to report to the North Carolina Department of the Environmental Quality (DEQ). Soil samples taken on the site by Falcon in early 2014 identified elevated levels of coal ash metals in the ground water such as arsenic, mercury, chromium, lead, thallium, and other dangerous pollutants. Well test results have been mixed at a new set of well locations, where the counsultant used filtered samples without finding high levels of dissolved coal ash pollutants.

Friends of Bolin Creek has raised questions about the procedures used and the choice of location for the tests, and we have communicated our concerns to the Town and Department of Environmental Quality.

The Town has posted a Web page called “Chapel Hill Coal Ash Disposal Site Remediation Project” containing relevant documents here. In mid 2015, Friends of Bolin Creek requested help from the Southern Environmental Law Center for legal and support services.

Clean up makes a difference.  According to a January 29, 2016 report, groundwater contamination dramatically declined along the Catawba-Wateree River after a South Carolina utility removed the coal ash under a settlement negotiated by the Southern Environmental Law Center. See article.

“These results confirm that when you remove the polluting coal ash, you also eliminate pollution of groundwater,” said Frank Holleman, senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. “Duke Energy and North Carolina’s Department of Environmental Quality must wake up to this reality, learn from South Carolina, and move all of Duke Energy’s polluting coal ash from unlined waterfront pits to safe dry lined storage.  Otherwise, North Carolina’s groundwater will be polluted for years to come.”

North Carolina has more than 30 such sites in 14 different locations across the state. A pipe running under one of the ponds run by Duke Energy in Eden NC ruptured in February of 2014. The coal ash spilled, largely affecting the Dan River which flows into Virginia. The spill is the third largest of its kind in U.S. history.

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Mary Sonis Reprise: “A Carolina Walk in the Woods”

Mary Sonis, photographer and naturalist will join us again for a talk about local wildlife.

Sunday, March 20th at 4:30 – 5:30 pm

Chapel Hill public library

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A Carolina Walk in the Woods

A Carolina Walk in the Woods

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No Buffers, No Birds

This article by naturalist Mary Sonis appeared in the Chapel Hill News on November 23, 2015.

Bolin Creek saw a great turnout of migrating warblers this fall along with a solid showing of many resident species. As the birds move south to their wintering grounds, the creek offers an invitation that is irresistible to wildlife, and especially to our warblers – water.

Every day from 4 to 6 p.m., I headed out with a camera and chair, and set up my viewing station along the creek. The sound of water flowing over rocks produces of soft murmur that can be heard by any passerby. It is this sound that draws the birds. From the safely of the dense undergrowth, birds cautiously make their way down the trees and find a variety of tiny shallow rock pools. It is there that they bathe and drink at the end of the day.

Some tiny pools are so sought after that birds line up to take their turn. The diminutive Northern Parula Warbler might be driven off by a more determined (and larger) Black and White Warbler, while a migrating Chestnut-sided Warbler on its journey from the Northeast, lands without hesitation, and ignores the fray. An entire family of resident American Redstarts appears daily. Two siblings practice their flying skills by chasing each other in and out of the creek zone, often zipping by my head as if to show off their newfound acrobatic skills. The more sedate parents call the youngsters in and make their own cautious forays to a small crevice between the rocks that holds a scant half-inch of water.

What is it about this habitat that is so appealing to wildlife?

A riparian zone is the area of vegetation that borders a creek or stream. It is often a dense, impenetrable area of tangled greenery. It shades the creek, soaks up water after floods, absorbs toxins in the water, prevents erosion, and provides a protection zone for wildlife.

At creek’s edge a beaver family builds a lodge that is nestled only a few feet from the path of high school runners. It is so close a region that the beavers lift their heads when they hear a passing runner or dog walker. Box Turtles forage the moist leaf litter in search of invertebrates, and find their own soaking pools in the ruts and puddles along the main dirt path. Spotted Salamanders spend their lives buried deep beneath rotting logs in the forest and creek border, making their yearly journey to the vernal pools on the path to lay their eggs when soaking spring rains flood the trail in February.

There is only one thing that won’t fit along the Bolin Creek Trail. Pavement.

For warblers, the riparian border offers a perfect habitat. There are plenty of insects to be gleaned from the leaves, hidden sites for nests, water for drinking or bathing and finally, vegetative cover to protect the warblers from predation by the owls and hawks that patrol the creek.

A riparian border is the golden area of any creek.

It is not surprising that this creek trail also draws large numbers of humans to the Carolina North Forest. It is a beautiful trail that local residents have used for years as a peaceful spot to walk their dogs. Our outstanding Chapel Hill High School cross country running team makes their way down the path at 4 o’clock, the same time that the warblers arrive. On sunny fall afternoons, science classes from Smith Middle School can be found studying water ecology at creek’s edge. Mountain bikers join the activity as they negotiate the roots and dips along the trail.

Surprisingly, it all works. Runners, hikers, naturalists, and mountain bikers all share the beauty of this small stretch of land that winds its way from Wilson Park to Chapel Hill High School.

There is only one thing that won’t fit along the Bolin Creek Trail. Pavement. Some groups in Carrboro are advocating for a paved greenway along the creek in Carrboro. In order to meet state Department of Transportation standards, this paved path would require a buffer of 10 feet on either side. Unfortunately, that buffer would cut into the riparian zone.

This is the golden area that we can’t afford to lose. No buffer, no birds. No erosion control, no shade, no carbon absorbing trees, no Box Turtles lingering in a cool patch of muddy water on a sunny day. Is the cost too high to create yet another paved commuting route for bikers? Let the Carrboro Board of Aldermen know what this trail means to our community. Let them know if you’ve taken your children on nature walks along Bolin creek to see our Barred owls. Let them know if you want your teenagers to run that trail with dirt beneath their feet, and warblers calling in the canopy.

Mary Sonis is a naturalist, photographer and writer in Carrboro. You can reach her at msonis@nc.rr.com

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Bolin Creek hike this weekend, Jan 9

My favorite discovery on moving here years ago, given I’m a transplanted Philadelphian, has been Bolin Creek.

Its upper reaches, between Homestead Road and Estes Drive, offers the most beautiful and contrasting landscape. Here, you will find beaver swamps, Beech-tree forests, steep river banks and volcanic hillsides that trace a more violent geologic past, a mere half a billion years. Particularly impressive is the ancient ravine behind Chapel Hill’s neighborhood of Ironwoods.

Yet, many citizens have yet to discover these wonders. All ages will have a chance this weekend, however, when Friends of Bolin Creek sponsors a two-hour hike at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 9, at Wilson Park. The hike is free and will feature several well-known experts talking about wildlife, forest ecology and the nature of creeks. Please meet us at the Wilson Park parking lot at 1:50 p.m.

Read more here:

chicadee

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Chapel Hill Booker Creek Watershed Study

Town Announcement:  Learn about what the Town hopes to achieve for improving water quality and reducing flooding by studying the Booker Creek Watershed.  Attend the Lower Booker Creek Subwatershed Study Information session hosted by the Town’s consultant W. K. Dickson.

Join us Thursday, January 7th,
11:30 am – 1:30 pm or  5:30 – 7:30 pm
Meeting Room B, Chapel Hill Public Library

For more information and to take the online survey, visit www.lowerbookercreeksws.org.

At this information session, you will be invited to share your observations and concerns about stormwater issues in the Booker Creek Watershed. Each session will begin with an opportunity to hear a short presentation and ask questions and end with a wrap-up session.

Contact Inga Kennedy at inga@peqatl.com for more information.
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The Town’s stormwater studies will make recommendations about how water quality can be improved and flooding can be mitigated.

Background supplied by CHALT:

Leading up to the May 2014 Ephesus-Fordham Zoning District vote, town council meetings attracted the concern of hundreds of citizens who viewed the new form-base zone zone as a give-away to development interests.  The new zone conferred huge density and “fast-track” review but asked nothing on behalf of the community  interest, i.e.,  community space, energy efficient building or affordable housing.

At the urging of the Stormwater Advisory Board and other environmentalists, the town council agreed to require water quality treatment for each project redeveloped or built in the new district. Maintenance of those stormwater facilities will be paid for by a district tax levied on the businesses in the district.

Control over the volume of stormwater,  as omitted from the plans for the new zone.  Much of the nearly 200 acres of the Ephesus-Fordham district (including Eastgate and Whole Foods area) are located  at the bottom of the Booker Creek watershed.  We can expect that as the 3 – 4 million square feet of already approved projects located in the upper parts of the watershed are constructed,  the volume of water flowing through this area will increase and flooding downstream will increase.

For more information on the North Carolina Legislative Changes to the Town’s development rules and ordinances,  attend the January 14, 5:30 pm briefing at Town Hall. View details here.

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An Open Letter to the Carrboro Board of Aldermen

Friends of Bolin Creek sent this letter to the Carrboro Board of Aldermen expressing our strong concern that the Climate Change Task Force recommended a paved road next to Bolin Creek. The Board decided to remove the controversial wording and also asked the staff  to schedule a time to revisit the paving question on a future agenda. Time TBA.

_____________________________

Memo to: Carrboro Board of Aldermen
Re:            Climate Change Report Draft
Date:         November 10, 2015

Friends of Bolin Creek compliments the Carrboro Board of Alderman for initiating ways to mitigate climate change as a local community. We appreciate the opportunity to comment on this draft report.

We strongly endorse the recommendation for the town to form a utility to improve stormwater management within the city limits. Stormwater management is a major program element of Friends of Bolin Creek. For the past several years we have spearheaded a volunteer rain garden program modeled on Durham’s Rain Catchers and the highly successful Ellerbe Creek rain garden program. If the Town forms a storm water utility, we will be happy to collaborate with the town to build even more rain gardens that infiltrate rainwater into the ground and keep pollutants out of our waterways.

Although we support most of the thoughtful recommendations found in this report, we are surprised and dismayed that the task force included a 6 year old controversial paving proposal in this draft report. To build a 30 foot wide, two mile paved route to DOT specs (as required when accepting federal funds) through a 425 acre contiguous forest would be counterproductive to the goals of this report.

Given the unjustified and controversial nature of this paving proposal, we strongly recommend removing it so that the draft report can be accepted and moved forward.

A bit of history is needed for those not present when the BOA met this controversy head on in December 2009. The Town had hired a consultant who issued a report with a number of greenway routes. The BOA accepted the majority of the consultant- recommended plans and they were subsequently planned or built.

However, given the widespread concern and evidence that construction close to the creek would harm the natural woodland experience, reduce the value of wildlife habitat, destabilize creek banks, harm water quality, and damage woodland ecology, the Board “tabled” phases 3 and 4 of the consultant’s report and subsequently referred consideration of these options to the Carrboro Greenways Commission. The Greenways Commission discussed the pros and cons of this proposal during a year of meetings and finally adopted a resolution recommending no action because several alternate north-south routes were planned. Both the Board and the Greenways Commission have acted wisely to not take any further action toward paving phases 3 and 4.

A contiguous forest is a rare thing, particularly so in our rapidly growing triangle area.

The Morgan and Little Creeks Local Watershed Plan did a base line study of Bolin Creek and its tributaries in 1994 sponsored by the town of Carrboro, Chapel Hill, the state and EPA, and was overseen by a stakeholder group of officials from all jurisdictions. It is that study that has enabled Carrboro to secure 119 grants from EPA for restoration work in the watershed.

Under the patient and persistence of Carrboro and Chapel Hill leaders over several decades, the plan for Carolina North did not sprawl into the Upper Bolin Creek Watershed. Instead the new campus will be clustered in a compact form on the existing airport runways. The UNC Board of Trustees and Council of State agreed to conserve permanently much of the UNC land in Carrboro’s jurisdiction for posterity, and others tracts for 50 years. This is significantly more protection than Battle Park on the UNC campus now receives. The Board should support these successful efforts by many to conserve Bolin Forest.

Finally, in addition to removing this paving project from this draft climate change report, we strongly support the Transportation Advisory Board recommendation to take a step back and make a comprehensive study of all existing and planned bike and pedestrian connections in the area, including Chapel Hill and Orange County, with an eye towards developing an improved plan for an effective transportation network that can maximize reduction of carbon emissions while also meeting high standards of environmental protection.

Signed,
Julie McClintock
Salli Benedict
Mary Faith Mount-Cors
Rob Crook
Marty Mandel
Rob McClure
John Morris
Will Raymond
Diane Robinson
Del Snow
Mary Sonis
Joan Widdifield

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